About Dave Follows


Creature Feature  - famous animal cartoon strip, appeared weekly in the Sunday Times supplement, ‘Funday Times’ for over 15 years 1990 to 2006.

Being a cartoonist! - Chapter 8 - Creature Feature

Chapter 8 of a 20-minute archive footage documentary of Dave talking about his cartooning career featuring, how he started cartooning, New York Cartoonists, The Strike, 'May un Mar Lady' and the Creature feature and other life changing events.

Featuring archive radio recording of Dave Follows interviewed by Franchesco Williams, with kind permission of BBC radio Stoke.

Cartoonist Dave Follows born, Stafford (1941-2003) made the successful transition from amateur cartoonist to professional in 1973, he won several national and international awards, including Humorous Comic Cartoonist of the Year 1983 for Wonder Wellies in Buster Comics.  Dave was an extremely popular and highly regarded member of the Cartoonist club of Great Britain, where he met many life long friends. Dave produced thousands upon thousands of original art works with what seemed effortless skill, almost all of Dave’s 30-year output still exists today, and its popularity remains as strong as ever.

Dave Follows professional cartooning career from 1971 to 2003. including: The Sunday Times ‘Creature Feature also syndicated in over thirty other newspapers throughout UK, Ireland, Germany and the Middle East, The Sentinels infamous ‘May un Mar Lady’, written in Potteries dialect, comic strips from The Buster and Whizzer and Chips and Hungry Hamsters animated comedy series.

Dave lived in Stafford throughout his life with wife Audrey they have three sons Darren, Steve and Christopher.


‘May un Mar Lady’ First published - July 8, 1985 to October 3, 2003 - Re-printed – full (7,000 strips) daily as of April 19, 2004. Dave supplied cartoon strips for over twenty local newspapers, including the North Staffordshire Evening Sentinel where the iconic May un Mar Lady strip appeared daily for over 18 years and enjoyed 9 year re-run, republished in the Sentinel entitled ‘May Un Mar Lady Revisited’, ending May 2012. And then re-run from 2015 in the nostalgia pages of the Sentinel

Cartoonist friends of Dave Follows

Dave was an extremely popular and highly regarded member of the Cartoonist club of Great Britain, where he met many life long friends. Interviews by Inspired Film and Video.

Dave was a cartoonists' cartoonist. Not just in the sense that his cartoons were so much admired by his colleagues, but in the social sense, too... If, by some chance, the name, Dave Follows is not a familiar one to you, you will still, almost certainly, recognize his cartoons, which have appeared in their thousands in newspaper strips, greeting cards, calendars and too many other places to mention. Of that bunch of cartoonists, gathered together at the end of a hard days drawing (we won't call it 'work'!) there would be only one surprised by the popularity of Dave's cartoons - Dave himself.


See Flickr images of the 'great' exhibition
The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery 19 April – 29 June 2008 A uniquely presented retrospective exhibition of local, national and international cartoons by renowned Stafford born cartoonists Dave Follows ....Press Release PDF- click here

Cartoonists quotes…

Noel Ford March 28 2007 Cartoonist, friend (For the exhibition):

Dave was a cartoonists' cartoonist. Not just in the sense that his cartoons were so much admired by his colleagues, but in the social sense, too… If, by some chance, the name, Dave Follows is not a familiar one to you, you will still, almost certainly, recognize his cartoons, which have appeared in their thousands in newspaper strips, greeting cards, calendars and too many other places to mention. Of that bunch of cartoonists, gathered together at the end of a hard days drawing (we won't call it 'work'!) there would be only one surprised by the popularity of Dave's cartoons - Dave himself. He has been described as a very modest cartoonist, and that was certainly true, but I think it went further than that. I think Dave genuinely did not believe in his own cartooning genius. I remember many an occasion when Dave couldn't wait to describe a particularly funny cartoon he had just drawn - he would be bubbling over, almost childlike in his enthusiasm.  But he wouldn't be telling me in order to solicit my admiration. On the contrary, he would be telling me because he wanted to share his own surprise that such a gag had, inexplicably, poured out of his pen.

The cartoons, here, represent a drop in the ocean compared to Dave's prodigious output, but there are more than enough to give you a glimpse of his great talent. And if, as you walk around, having a quiet chuckle or even laughing aloud, Dave himself is looking down, he's probably thinking, "I expect they only came in to get out of the rain."

Paul Hardman Cartoonist, friend:

"Dave had organised a cartoonists' tour of the Potteries and was very fretful as this all fell apart at the first hurdle when the buses failed to arrive to take us all from the hotel to a reception at the Sentinel offices.

Dave was beside himself and wanting to make contact with a taxi firm to bale us out. "Has any one got a mobile?" he shouts.

John Witt, one of the cartoonists, told him to calm down and answer the phone as he had already contacted the firm.

He handed Dave the handset, which he put to his ear and spent some considerable time trying to contact someone before realising that he had been handed a television handset.

Of course in the true spirit of Dave, this absolutely made his day and immediately calmed him right down."

Noel Ford Cartoonist, friend

"Dave was due to do a strip cartoon about "The Last of the Summer Wine" for the Daily Star. But on his very first day working full-time as a cartoonist the paper rang and said the deal was off.

Dave said he sat there and cried. And his wife Audrey came in and said: 'There's no use sitting moping, get on with it and be funny'".

Paul Hardman Cartoonist, friend

"Dave was one of the most unassuming and modest of craftsmen who was probably the only person on God's earth who genuinely had no idea as to why his work was held in such high esteem. He would giggle like a little kid and get all flustered when anybody paid him a compliment or gave him an award."

Graham Fowell Cartoonist, friend

"Dave's contribution to the world of cartooning was signficant.

As well as his internationally acclaimed 'Creature Feature', Dave's cartoons for his local audience were beautifully crafted observations of Staffordshire and its people, complete with a local dialect - Dave was a one off."

Video interviews by Inspired Film and Video

Interesting facts about Dave Follows from his sister Heather:

David has always been known as Dave... even from a young age.

He was the oldest sibling... Dave being born in 1941 brother Trevor 1943 and sister Heather 1949.

Dave’s first school was Holmcroft School Stafford...which he left when he was 11, he then moved to Dartmouth Street School which was a all Male School...he stayed there till he was 15yrs old.

Even from a VERY early age Dave showed a natural talent for drawing and drove his family made by drawing in covers of books...nothing was safe, they were always animals ...mainly dogs faces. Going to Dartmouth street helped Dave come into his own, at Dartmouth Street they did stage productions, their Christmas panto’s are still talked about...Dave started to shine.

When he left school his first job was painting and decorating with a man called... Don Pettit he then went to Dormans.

Dave was into music with his brother Trevor and he used to drive the family mad, Trevor on Drums and Dave on the guitar. Dave had a good voice and was in a number of group’s, one was called, ‘’The Nelsons’’ He did a lot for charity with the ‘’Link’’ these were a group of people who would put a party on for the old folk at Christmas time...and a show, singing etc....Dave did this for many years.

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